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‘I was a teacher for 17 years, but I couldn’t read or write’

From the BBC News:

John Corcoran grew up in New Mexico in the US during the 1940s and 50s. One of six siblings, he graduated from high school, went on to university, and became a teacher in the 1960s – a job he held for 17 years. But, as he explains here, he hid an extraordinary secret.

When I was a child I was told by my parents that I was a winner, and for the first six years of my life I believed what my parents had told me.

I was late in talking, but I went off to school with high hopes of learning to read like my sisters, and for the first year things were fine because there weren’t many demands on us other than standing in the right line, sitting down, keeping our mouths shut and going to the bathroom on time.

And then in the second grade we were supposed to learn to read. But for me it was like opening a Chinese newspaper and looking at it – I didn’t understand what those lines were, and as a child of six, seven, eight years old I didn’t know how to articulate the problem.

I remember praying at night and saying, “Please Lord, let me know how to read tomorrow when I get up” and sometimes I’d even turn on the light and get a book and look at it and see if I got a miracle. But I didn’t get that miracle.

At school I ended up in the dumb row with a bunch of other kids who were having a hard time learning to read. I didn’t know how I got there, I didn’t know how to get out and I certainly didn’t know what question to ask.

The teacher didn’t call it the “dumb row” – there wasn’t any cruelty or anything – but the kids called it the dumb row, and when you’re in that dumb row you start thinking you’re dumb.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE.

h/t Toya Algarin

Pursuing the power of self-sovereignty and personalized learning to create secure citizens and abundant communities. #TheOppositeOfSchool #AllPowerToThePupil

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